Supporting Birth, Breastfeeding, Newborns & Infants

Birth can often be a riveting experience for a child's head and body. Craniosacral Process, with its exceptionally gentle touch, can help an infant afterward.

Notice how this infant skull (veiwed from above), shows how much space there is between the bones. Most of the bones in our adult cranium are still in sections as an infant and child. For example the frontal bone which makes up our forehead is in 2 sections in an infant head. They will fully fuse into one bone within an infant's first year. Some bones are in four sections like our Temporal bones (where your ear comes out and jaw attaches). This bone takes 3 years to ossify, while others, like the Sacrum (the bottom of your spine at your pelvis) doesn't totally ossify until an adult's 20's!

During delivery these bone sections naturally glide over each other to allow the infant to get through the birth canal. This is also why infants are often delivered with cone shaped heads. Sometimes, however, cranial bones glide over each other and then get partially stuck. This can happen more often If medical interventions were used to help the infant such as:

Supporting Birth, Breastfeeding, Newborns & Infants

Birth can often be a riveting experience for a child's head and body. Craniosacral Process, with its exceptionally gentle touch, can help an infant afterward.

Notice how this infant skull (veiwed from above), shows how much space there is between the bones. Most of the bones in our adult cranium are still in sections as an infant and child. For example the frontal bone which makes up our forehead is in 2 sections in an infant head. They will fully fuse into one bone within an infant's first year. Some bones are in four sections like our Temporal bones (where your ear comes out and jaw attaches). This bone takes 3 years to ossify, while others, like the Sacrum (the bottom of your spine at your pelvis) doesn't totally ossify until an adult's 20's!

During delivery these bone sections naturally glide over each other to allow the infant to get through the birth canal. This is also why infants are often delivered with cone shaped heads. Sometimes, however, cranial bones glide over each other and then get partially stuck.